Start out small
If the idea of transforming a large room into a traditionally styled one seems overwhelming, start on a smaller scale, like in the master bathroom. Keep the cabinets and counters neutral and add some glamor with the wall and accent colors. Favored shades in traditional decorating are jewel tones, like topaz and golds; deep reds and rose quartz; marine blues and vibrant greens. Use accessories like embroidered towels, bronze or iron bath accessory ensembles and potpourri bowls as the perfect finishing touches.

Another great way to add traditional flair to your bath is with elegant and elaborate fixtures. Look for a faucet with unique and detailed design elements, like the new Weymouth bathroom collection from Moen. From the European-influenced decorative script on the porcelain inlays to the refined top finial, this collection definitely stands apart. And just because you’re incorporating stylish, traditional items, doesn’t mean you have to skimp on modern functionality or features. You can reduce water usage by up to 32 percent, thanks to a water-saving aerator. Tie the whole space together by selecting an Old World finish, such as Oil Rubbed Bronze, and you’ll create a traditional suite that’s comforting and classic.
 
Difference in the details
One of the best ways to add traditional style throughout your entire home is with architectural details, like moldings, chair rails or ceiling medallions. It’s easier to add these elements than you may think – and at a reasonable price. Peel and stick crown molding from Easy Crown Molding allows you to add the luxurious look of custom molding to your home. In less than one hour – and without tools – you can complete an entire room. Simply pick your desired trim style and width and get started.

Lush fabrics are also key to achieving a traditional look and feel in these spaces. But, don’t be afraid of the elegance found in traditional decor. Silks, satins, velvets and brocades are going to be your go-to fabrics for pillows and upholstered furniture. Be sure to stay away from solids – mixing coordinating patterns, like florals, stripes and scrolling, add even more richness. Don’t forget to make a statement with your windows, too – hang draperies that are full and heavy, and be sure to tie them back with ornate tassels for a look that is unmistakably traditional. It’s often easy to find great traditional pieces at affordable prices at department stores like Macy’s or Target. From pillows to curtains, bedding and even furniture, your local department store is one of the best places to start your traditional search.

Bringing traditional styling to your home is much easier – and accessible – than you think. With the right updates and additions to your space, you’ll achieve a look that’s timeless and refined. For more information about the new Weymouth collection from Moen, visit moen.com.

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When the housing bubble burst, a staggering number of Americans were affected – 4.8 million borrowers lost a home to foreclosure while a further 2.2 million gave up their homes in short sales, according to national data by RealtyTrac. The recovery of the housing market has been slow, but the confidence of once-foreclosed-upon homeowners has grown along with it. Sixty-five percent of Americans in Fannie Mae’s national monthly housing survey for April said they would rather buy a home rather than rent if they were going to move. With a new perspective on saving and making wise investments, many of those affected are now eager to get back to being homeowners.

Many former homeowners have learned difficult lessons, and their road back to homeownership will be signposted with challenges. However, it may be possible for them to regain their dreams. These tips from Wells Fargo, the nation’s leading mortgage lender, may help set prospective buyers on the right path:

* Talk to a reputable lender about owning a home again. Having someone on your side to help you through the process is important, but it’s essential that that person has the experience and knowledge to help you make an informed, affordable lending choice. An experienced lender can explain the time limits that affect buyers who faced foreclosure or short sale; there is generally a set amount of time that needs to pass before you’re eligible to be considered again for mortgage approval. Wells Fargo has a mortgage presence in 2,358 locations including stand-alone mortgage stores and other business partner sites. Go to www.wellsfargo.com/mortgage to find a home mortgage consultant near you.

* Make an honest assessment of your credit situation. In the current mortgage approval environment, having a foreclosure or short sale on your financial record will affect what options you may have for loan approval. You can access your credit report from any of the three agencies by going to www.annualcreditreport.com; everyone is entitled to a free annual report. If you need help in making sense of your financial status and information on how to improve it, you can talk to a Wells Fargo Home Mortgage consultant about the My Home Roadmap(SM) service. Those enrolled in My Home Roadmap receive up to two hours of free, phone-based financial coaching from an accredited credit counseling agency, paid for by Wells Fargo. Enrollees also receive emails from Wells Fargo Home Mortgage consultants that provide useful tips and reminders on handling the financial responsibilities of homeownership.

* Prepare a down payment. Homebuyers re-entering the housing market after foreclosure or short sale typically need to have a down payment – in most cases 20 percent – ready before purchasing a home. In addition to those funds, think about additional expenses you might have to pay, such as closing costs. Showing the ability to handle the financial responsibilities of homeownership beyond the monthly mortgage payment like taxes, homeowner’s insurance, utilities and other household expenses will be extremely important in achieving loan approval.

* Get preapproved. It’s a good idea for prospective homebuyers, even those who are re-entering the market, to work with lenders who offer a pre-approval program. The preapproval process helps borrowers determine and understand their budget before diving into a home search, allowing them to shop more confidently.

Homeownership is still part of the American dream, even for those who’ve dealt with foreclosure. To ensure that your next home is your dream home, plan carefully, get help and take a proactive approach to answering the tough questions.

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Have no fear – these six tips from Summer Baltzer, interior designer and former host of HGTV’s Design on a Dime will get you remodeling like a pro without losing your mind or breaking the bank.

Tip one: Breathe in. Breathe out. Break it down.

Before starting, take a deep breath and know that your project is going to turn out great. The key is to break your remodel down into manageable steps that you can wrap your head around: cabinets, counters, floors, paint and accessories. Although it can seem like a daunting process, there is no need to freak out.

Tip two: Identify the function of the room.

Take a second to think about how you use your kitchen. The best outcome is a kitchen that’s both beautiful and functional, so make sure you’re not getting caught up in just color swatches, paint samples and tile styles. Ask yourself a few simple questions: Who primarily uses the kitchen? How much foot traffic will there be? What are the main tasks occurring in the space? Pausing to think about how the space will be used helps you create a kitchen that works for your life.

Tip three: Make the space work for you.

If you are considering a new layout, first think about how you move around the kitchen. There’s nothing more frustrating than furiously trying to get dinner on the table for a group of friends when you can’t find anything or move around your kitchen with ease. Determine the types of stations you always use and what you need in each station. Add drawers or containers for utensils or herbs … anything you might need to quickly grab while standing in that place. If you can’t recreate your floor plan, sometimes it’s simply a matter of reorganizing. Don’t assume you’re stuck with what you’ve got.

Tip four: Understand the scope of your work.

Is this kitchen makeover going to involve a partial or complete demolition, or are you going to be implementing simple fixes that you can pull off in a weekend? The work you’re looking to do will determine whether or not you need to hire a contractor and apply for permits or, if it’s just you, bribe your friends and buy that bucket of paint. It’s often smartest to look to a trained professional to handle the trickier parts of a kitchen makeover. Hire contractors who carry insurance to deal with your electrical and plumbing issues, use a professional installer to replace that new countertop and keep in mind that you may void the warranty on items if you install them incorrectly.

Tip five: Make a budget.

Though not as much fun as picking colors and fixtures, having a clear idea of what you can afford is important. Determine your budget and consider funds for unanticipated issues such as mold or plumbing pitfalls. If you have enough in the budget to deal with problems as they arise, you’ll be less stressed and can complete the project without a hitch. Finally, consider eco-friendly and durable materials that can be more affordable, including reclaimed wood, low-VOC paints, and countertops made from recycled fibers such as Wilsonart HD High Definition Laminate that can give the look of granite at a fraction of the cost. They’ll keep more of the green in your kitchen and in your wallet. Learn more at www.wilsonart.com.

Tip six: Keep track of your paperwork.

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of remodeling a kitchen, but the business end of a makeover is just as important. Keep track of contracts, warranties, manuals and receipts. Numbers used to identify paint colors and finishes are important too. Having everything accessible in a “kitchen makeover file” will make it easy to call for repairs or even simple touch-up if need be.

Armed with the basics, you’ll be well-prepared to create a kitchen you love.

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Here is the honest truth: most people get into Internet Marketing because they are convinced it is an easy way to earn quick money. Their approach is to make a fast website, put up some advertising and a few affiliate links, then sit back and watch while they earn real cash. There are a large amount of individuals who do this and also earn lots of money on the internet. But what if you want more than some extra or even quick cash? Can Internet Marketing really be leveraged to produce a worthwhile and long term career?

The quick and dirty answer is that yes, you are able to make Internet Marketing your long term and sustainable career. You only need to take on the project properly. The procedures and programs you use to build something to earn fast money are not all that different than the methods and systems you will use to build long term profits. So what would you do if you need to develop a sustainable career on the internet?

It is very important that the first thing you do, in order to earn long term money online, is accept the fact that you are going to have to do real work. You will have to do actual and real work on a daily basis. You will have days when you feel fantastic about what you do and days when you wish you could find something else to take on. This means it’s just about like every other occupation out there. If you want to produce lasting cash flow by working a lot right now and not at all later on then you are going to be in for a rude awakening. So be ready to roll up your sleeves and get to work.

There are a few ventures that lend themselves much better to a long term career than others. Affiliate marketing, to use one example, is a great job for someone who wants to earn money on a part time basis or to supplement your already existent income. Is it truly possible to earn a full time income in this manner? You could if you pick out only the right products and then work like crazy to promote them. A far better approach, nevertheless, is to create your own products or websites and then promote those. This gives you full control over the projects you take on and how you accomplish them. And you will end up more likely to stick with it in the long run. If you want to give a service on the web, this works much the same way. Writers, for example, need to create websites for themselves and create portfolios that they can point to as examples of their work.

Finally, perhaps the most significant thing that you need to recognize is that, when you want to build a long term and reliable income on the internet, you need to truly dedicate yourself to your task. You might have fun and feel rewarded by your efforts, but first you should tell yourself “yes, I really want to do this.” Making a half-hearted effort is not about to get you anywhere.

by: Tanaka Ara

Article Source:

http://www.articlecity.com/articles/marketing/article_6729.shtml

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From home and health to auto, life, disability and more, it’s important to be smart about how you buy coverage to limit costs, purchase the right coverage and avoid redundancies.

The best place to start is on your state’s official government website, says FindLaw.com, the nation’s leading website for free legal information. There you will find a list of licensed insurers so you can be assured that you’re dealing with a legitimate company.

“Work with a reputable insurance agent who represents a financially sound, highly-rated company,” advises Ed Susolik, an attorney who specializes in insurance law at Callahan & Blaine in Santa Ana, Calif. “As is often the case, you get what you pay for. You don’t want to add to a tragedy by discovering that you’re underinsured or that the policy you’ve purchased from a little-known company is fraught with loopholes.”

Here are some additional tips from FindLaw.com on purchasing insurance coverage:

Follow the law. Check the laws of your state. You may be required to carry certain types of insurance, such as liability insurance to operate a car, motorcycle or boat. This also applies on the federal level, for example, with the passage of the Affordable Care Act, all Americans will be required to carry health insurance as of 2014.

Read your policy. Many Americans don’t read their insurance policies and hastily sign contracts without considering the implications. For example, if your health insurance covers 90 percent of all medical bills and you require significant medical attention, the 10 percent for which you’re responsible could add up. If you have trouble understanding what a policy proposal covers, don’t hesitate to slow down and ask your agent for clarification or get a quote from a different company. Remember: you’re buying insurance to ease, and not trouble, your state of mind.

Plan for major milestones. Major events will trigger the need to purchase insurance or increase your existing coverage. With the birth of a first child, parents should consider purchasing term life insurance. It offers a benefit to a spouse and child to cover living expenses if one parent dies before the child reaches adulthood.

Inspect your home insurance. Carefully review your home insurance policy. Are you insured for your home’s market value or replacement value? The replacement value is the cost of rebuilding your house, while the market value is based on an appraisal of its value in relationship to surrounding homes. Your agent should be willing to work with you to sculpt the policy that meets your needs.

Consider flood insurance. Standard homeowners insurance typically does not include flood insurance. First, determine the level of risk for flooding in your area. There are a few options online, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s website (www.fema.gov), where you can search your address and assess flooding risk. Your insurance agent also should have access to this information and can explore your options with you.

Add an umbrella policy. It’s not a bad idea to purchase an umbrella liability policy to provide additional coverage above and beyond your homeowner’s insurance. This helps in situations where you could be at fault for accidents, such as your dog biting a mail carrier or a tree in your yard falling onto a neighbor’s car.

Research renter’s insurance. Apartments can be burglarized or damaged like any other property. If you rent, consider purchasing renter’s insurance to cover assets such as computers, furniture and other significant items.

Inventory your belongings. Take photos or videos, with audio descriptions, of your property so you and the insurance company have an accurate record of your belongings in the event of a fire or other accident. Capture your home, prized possessions and high-value items such as cars, boats, jewelry and collections. Store the files on a portable hard drive in a secure and safe location, such as a safe deposit box.

To learn more about insurance and the law, visit FindLaw.com.

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Permanent Change of Station (PCS) and Personally Procured Moves (PPM) come with military assistance to help soldiers and their families make the transition. Families can also take advantage of the do-it-yourself (DITY) option offered by the military, which could make the overall transition much smoother.

No matter how quickly the move happens, or what kind of moving assistance your family requests, here are some moving tips from Penske Truck Rental to help keep everything in order.

* Planning – PCS notifications can come without a lot of warning, or families may know about a potential move far in advance. For both instances, getting a plan in place is a good start. Gather important information into one folder, containing phone numbers, contact names, dates, receipts and checklists in this folder so you can easily track everything about your move. For some planning tools that focus specifically on military moves, visit the U.S. Department of Defense website.

* Moving – Many families choose the DITY option because it gives them more control over the move, and they can also potentially make some money in the process. The military provides an allotted cost for moving, and if you can come under that cost through your own planning, the military will pay you the difference. For example, Penske Truck Rental offers active military personnel a 10 percent discount when they reserve a truck online, and an additional 10 percent off when they show an active military ID while picking up the truck. Penske will price-match any competitive offers on one-way truck rentals as well. Visit www.DITYmove.com to learn more.

* Weights – Military rules require soldiers to certify the weight of the rental vehicle when empty and after it’s fully loaded. Weight limit reimbursements are set depending on a soldier’s rank and dependents, but the traditional weights are estimated at 1,000 pounds per room, excluding bathrooms and storage areas. Then add in the estimated weight of large appliances, garage items and items in storage. Compare this number to what is allowed and determine if you can reduce the load in any way to avoid paying overweight costs. To help with weight certifications, Penske offers a Certified Public Scale locator tool online to help DITY movers in finding weigh stations.

* Contact info – File a change of address form at your local post office so mail can be forwarded, and also make certain your new information is updated with your specific branch of the military.

* Explore – Get to know your new neighborhood, both on and off base. If you have children, explore the schools and the after-school activities available. Learn a bit about the city’s history and gather information on the services the city offers so that on moving day, your water and electricity will be available when it’s needed.

When in the military, a move is practically inevitable, but the process can be much less stressful on both emotions and finances with a little organization and planning from the get-go.

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First impressions are everything when it comes to selling a home, and peeling paint, stained carpets and unpleasant odors can be an instant turn-off for buyers. Fortunately, you can take simple and inexpensive steps to prep your home for a quick, top-dollar sale.

Freshen up:

Paint is an easy, cost-effective way to improve any interior, and a new coat can make all the difference in selling your home. Cracked or peeling paint will repel potential buyers, and faded or boring walls can create a lackluster overall appearance.

Make your home stand out with a fresh coat in a vibrant color, such as those found in Dutch Boy’s Crayola palette. Perfect for showcasing a finished basement, kids’ room or accent wall anywhere in the home, these bright shades will make any space pop. With 96 colors to choose from – from Marshmallow and Ice Pop, to Wild Strawberry and Inch Worm – you’re sure to find a shade to help make your home memorable. And as you are updating walls with new color, use a paint that not only adds beauty but also reduces odors. Along with the exceptional coverage Dutch Boy is known for, Refresh features Arm & Hammer Odor Eliminating Technology to rid your home of unwanted odors, leaving your home smelling clean and inviting. Available for walls, trim and ceilings, use Refresh throughout the home to create a pleasant walk-through experience. Add a few scented candles or potpourri to make the home even more appealing to buyers’ noses.

Little fixes:

The little things can make a big difference when it comes to the appearance of your home. Many buyers are looking to make as few improvements as possible, and even tiny cosmetic repairs can seem like a huge project. The more move-in-ready your house appears, the faster it will sell, and more likely buyers will be willing to pay the asking price. Some easy fixes include replacing broken counter and floor tiles, patching holes in any surfaces, making sure all lights work properly and doors open and close smoothly.

Organize and de-personalize:

To give your home a spacious showroom feel, take time to remove any superfluous stuff. Show off your kitchen countertops by storing unnecessary appliances, clear the sink and dishwashing machine, and organize refrigerator contents. Keep the bathroom vanity clear of personal items, neatly fold or hang clean towels, and clear or cover clothing hampers. Organize your cupboards, closets and drawers to maximize the appearance of your home’s storage capabilities.

Clearing your home of visible clutter will not only make it seem more spacious but also make it easier for potential buyers to picture it as their own. Minimize family photos and personal items to help visitors more easily see themselves – and their things – in your home.

Curb appeal:

First impressions can make a world of difference, so don’t neglect your home’s exterior as you prepare to sell. The mailbox should be in good condition and the house number easily visible from the street. Keep exterior doors, including garage doors, free of flaking or fading paint and freshen the trim around windows and shutters. A fresh coat of paint on the front door can add to your home’s curb appeal and affixing a seasonal display of flowers or a festive wreath on the front door also makes a warm, welcoming statement.

A few simple projects can vastly improve your home’s overall appearance, and with these tips, your home will be sold in no time.

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For all of the discussion around the importance of credit scores, it’s hard to know what’s true, what’s fiction, and what lies in between.

While there are misperceptions and misunderstandings still lingering in the marketplace, the good news is that overall knowledge about credit scoring is improving. A recent survey by the Consumer Federation of America (CFA) and VantageScore Solutions, one of the two primary companies that generate credit scores, shows that consumers know they have more than one credit score, have a better understanding about the factors that affect credit scores, and have increased familiarity with how different kinds of companies and entities use credit scores. Consumers also have a good handle on some recent additions to federal laws regarding when lenders are required to inform borrowers about their credit scores.  

“Increases in consumer knowledge probably reflect, in part, the increased public attention given to credit scores because of the new protections,” says Stephen Brobeck, executive director, CFA. “The improvements may also be related to increased efforts of financial educators, including our own educational website, creditscorequiz.org, to inform consumers about credit reports and scores.”  

However, despite the positive developments, there’s room for improvement according to the CFA-VantageScore Solutions survey.

Myth: Low credit scores don’t greatly affect how much you pay over the life of the loan.

Fact: Low scores can be costly. Only 29 percent of survey respondents were aware that on a $20,000, 60-month auto loan, a borrower with a low credit score is likely to pay at least $5,000 more than a borrower with a high credit score.

Myth: Age and marital status are factors used in calculating credit scores.

Fact: Over 50 percent of survey respondents incorrectly believed their age and marital status were factors used to calculate their credit scores. The only factors credit score models use are related to your use of credit, especially whether you make payments on time.

Myth: Multiple inquiries when applying for a consumer or mortgage loan will have a negative effect on your score.

Fact: If multiple inquiries occur during a one-to two-week window, generally they will not lower your credit scores. Only 9 percent of respondents were aware of this, and 34 percent incorrectly believed that each inquiry will lower your score.

Understanding credit scoring can be complex, but it’s in your best interest to get the facts straight. With a clear view of what’s true and false, it’s easier to set the course for a sound financial future. For more information about the myths and facts of credit, visit www.creditscorequiz.org, www.vantagescore.com  and www.consumerfed.org. These websites are free, do not display any advertising and do not collect any personal data. Both the online quiz and a corresponding brochure are also available in Spanish at www.creditscorequiz.org/Espanol.

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You might not be aware that your home may pose some hidden risks for you and your family. But you don’t need a fat budget to give your home a safer and healthier boost. After all, there is nothing more important than keeping your family safe.

Hazards may be lurking in your home, and for $100 or less, you can make the home improvement precautions needed to protect your family from common household dangers. Danny Lipford, home improvement expert and host of the nationally syndicated show “Today’s Homeowner,” recommends these budget-friendly DIY projects for a safer and healthier home:

* Mount smoke detectors: There should be a smoke detector on each floor and in or near every bedroom in the home. Installing them is as simple as mounting them 4 inches from the wall on the ceiling. Smoke rises, so opt to place the detector at the highest point of the ceiling if you have an angled ceiling.

Estimated cost: $30

* Install a water filter: If you’re concerned about lead, VOCs, microbial cysts and pharmaceuticals in your tap water, or even if you just don’t like the taste or smell of it, install a DIY water filtration system such as the High Performance Drinking Water System that comes with a dedicated faucet and will provide your family with cleaner, better tasting water.

Estimated cost: $100

* Secure heavy furniture and appliances: Children are susceptible to bookshelves, televisions or other furniture falling over and causing harm. Use furniture brackets or straps to secure dressers, the stove, audio equipment and more to the wall to ensure passersby are safe from falling and tipping items.

Estimated cost: $10 or more, depending on number needed

* Install carbon monoxide alarms: Carbon monoxide, an odorless, colorless, poisonous gas, is a result of improperly vented or defective home systems such as heaters, furnaces and fireplaces. Carbon monoxide does not rise to the ceiling like smoke, so the alarms can be mounted anywhere, such as plugged into wall outlets or affixed to walls and powered by batteries.

Estimated cost: $50

* Install a bathroom vent fan: Poor ventilation in the bathroom can lead to a buildup of excess moisture, which is a breeding ground for mold and mildew. Install a bathroom vent fan to push the moist air outside the home to avoid creating unhealthy conditions in the room, as well as fogged-up windows, steamy mirrors, and eventually ruined walls and ceilings.

Estimated cost: $100

For more information and other tips, visit FiltreteWater.com.

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It can really pay to pay attention, says Mark Riepe, head of Schwab Center for Financial Research, who adds, “One way to reduce your investment return is to ignore fees.”

A seemingly small difference in fees can make a potentially big difference in your return. Here’s a hypothetical example: let’s assume you make a $10,000 investment that earns six percent each year for the next 20 years. If you were to pay one-half of one percent in fees each year on that investment, after 20 years your after-fee balance – or net return – would be about $29,000. But if your annual fee was closer to 1.5 percent, after 20 years that $29,000 would shrink to about $24,000 – or about 20 percent less.

So how can you make sure to take ownership over the money you’ve invested and your financial future? Knowledge is the first step – here are some of the most common fees to be aware of:

Commissions

Commissions are the fees you are charged when you place a trade with a brokerage firm. If you trade frequently, commissions can add up fast. There are many brokerage firms that offer commission-free products, such as certain exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and no-load mutual funds.

Portfolio management fees

If you use a professional to help you with portfolio management, there are two primary fees to keep in mind. The first is an annual fee, which is usually a set percentage and can vary depending on the advisor and the amount of assets in your portfolio. For example, you might pay one percent of $250,000 you have invested, or $2,500 per year. But there can also be fees for the underlying investments in your portfolio, including commissions and operating expenses that you pay on top of the annual fee.

Mutual fund fees

Mutual fund investors are charged a percentage of the fund’s average net assets. This is called the operating expense ratio, or OER, and it covers the fund’s management expenses. These fees can vary, so investors should always compare OERs before purchasing a mutual fund, especially when deciding between two similar funds. OERs are listed in the fund’s prospectus and most can be found online. Typically, the more complex the fund, the more management it requires and the more it costs. It’s important to know that OERs are charged on top of any transaction fees or commissions you might pay to invest in the fund.

Bond fees

In most cases with bonds, when you buy or sell you either pay a percentage or flat fee, however the yield on a bond is impacted by what you pay for it, so finding the lowest cost is to your advantage. It is a good idea to compare prices from multiple bond dealers before settling.

Exchange traded fund fees (ETF)

An ETF is a fund that can be traded like a stock. Depending on how frequently you buy and sell ETFs you may be more or less concerned with some of their fees. For example, if you trade ETFs more frequently, the commission you are charged for each transaction can add up quickly. You also want to pay attention to the bid/ask spread – the prices at which people are willing to buy and sell the fund. If you’re planning to hold an ETF over a longer period of time, the commission and spread become less important, since they are one-time costs. But “buy and hold” ETF investors should pay close attention to the fund’s expense ratio, which is a recurring fee.

Of course lower expenses do not necessarily translate into higher returns, but they are important to understand. One way to be more aware of the fees you’re paying is to regularly review your statement. Being an informed and engaged investor today can have a real impact on your ability to achieve your investing goals tomorrow, whether that’s retirement, saving for your child’s education or purchasing a home.

More information is available at www.schwab.com.

Scenario is hypothetical in nature and not intended to predict or project the performance of any specific investment product.

Investors should carefully consider information contained in the prospectus, including investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. You can request a prospectus by calling Schwab at 800-435-4000. Please read the prospectus carefully before investing.

Investment returns will fluctuate and are subject to market volatility, so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Unlike mutual funds, shares of ETFs are not individually redeemable directly with the ETF. Shares are bought and sold at market price, which may be higher or lower than the net asset value (NAV).

Bond, investments are subject to various risks, including changes in interest rates, credit quality, market valuations, liquidity, prepayments, corporate events, tax ramifications, and other factors

Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., Member SIPC (0813-5603)

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